News

Telehealth may not have been at the top of mind before 2020, unless you live in a rural or hard-to-reach location, but these days, many people are facing the new reality of doctor appointments online or by phone. Telehealth isn’t reserved just for talking to your doctor or nurse practitioner about medical issues, though. It
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“I’m one of the doctors taking care of your dad.” As a resident, I made this call countless times. Even more than breaking bad news to patients, I feared surprising their families at night by telephone. Nearly always, though, people were calm and certain despite the circumstances, and their response was always the same: “Do
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News broke earlier this week that AstraZeneca, a pharmaceutical company running one of the leading COVID-19 vaccine trials, had stopped their work because of possible medical complications in a participant. The health news site STAT reported this morning that the participant who got sick was a woman in the United Kingdom. Although it wasn’t officially confirmed, she
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A novel biomarker could help identify progression in Parkinson’s disease, distinguish it from other neurodegenerative disorders, and monitor response to treatments. Although the biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NfL), is not especially specific, it is the first blood-based biomarker for Parkinson’s disease. Neurofilaments are components of the neural cytoskeleton, where they maintain structure along with other functions. Following
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Being told the operating room has already been cleaned. Being questioned by patients about where you went to medical school. Being asked for ID every time you enter your own hospital. Being told you don’t look like a doctor. In a series of conversations with Medscape, Black physicians talk about racism they’ve faced in their
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The evolution of modern psychiatry has at times been fraught, but the discipline has adapted and survived through periods of controversy. As with any scientific endeavor, self-criticism and self-correction are intentional built-in features required for growth that move us closer to truth. Disciplines that lack rigorous mechanisms for such interrogation, such as the peer-review process,
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People who experience “sudden” out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may feel malaise days earlier, new research from Denmark suggests. The new analysis shows that 2 weeks before a cardiac arrest, 54% of people had had phone, email, or in-person contact with their general practitioner, and 6.8% had gone to a hospital emergency department or outpatient clinic
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“Buy this new treatment now, before it runs out!” “No need to see a doctor, our treatments will cure you of the virus.” “Your stimulus check is waiting. Click here to learn how to access your funds.” If you’ve seen anything even remotely similar to these lines while browsing the internet, you’re not alone. Thousands
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“Say it, don’t spray it.” The old adage is now being hailed by experts as a way to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Research analyzed by The Atlantic suggests talking more quietly — or not at all — can drastically reduce the rate of COVID-19 transmission. The virus primarily spreads through particles that exit
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. The immune system overactivation known as a “cytokine storm” does not play a major role in more severe COVID-19 outcomes, according to unexpected findings in new research. The findings stand in direct contrast to many previous reports. “We were indeed surprised
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In the interest of public health and safety, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is calling for the elimination of daylight saving time in favor of permanent year-round standard time — a recommendation that has garnered strong support from multiple medical and other high-profile organizations. “Permanent, year-round standard time is the best choice to
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A truncated course of glecaprevir-pibrentasvir (Mavyret) prophylaxis started prior to transplant allowed patients without hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to safely receive kidneys from HCV-positive donors, a small single-center study found. In all, 10 transplants from HCV-positive donors to HCV-negative recipients (HCV D+/R-) were performed, and viral RNA was undetectable in all recipients starting at
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We get it. Wearing a mask can be uncomfortable. They’re hot. They get damp if you exert yourself. The elastics may hurt your ears. So it can be tempting to try using a face shield instead – a clear plastic shield that covers your face from your forehead down. But shields were never meant to be
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Final 18-month results of the EVAPORATE trial suggest icosapent ethyl (Vascepa) provides even greater slowing of coronary plaque progression when added to statins for patients with high triglyceride levels, but not all cardiologists are convinced. The study was designed to explore a potential mechanism behind the cardiovascular event reduction in REDUCE-IT. Previously reported interim results
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Teenagers and people over age 65, the two groups most at risk for car accidents and injuries, are more likely to drive less safe cars. That is the finding of a new study from the Center for Injury Research and Prevention (CIRP) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the first large-scale, statewide analysis of vehicle safety
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About one-third of all patients with psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a condition that comes with a host of vague symptoms and no definitive blood test for diagnosis. Prevention trials could help to identify higher-risk groups for PsA, with a goal to catch disease early and improve outcomes. The challenge is finding enough participants
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Welcome to this week’s edition of Healthcare Career Insights. This weekly roundup highlights healthcare career-related articles culled from across the Web to help you learn what’s next. Ericka L. Adler, JD, cautions practices and physicians wanting to offer wellness services to make sure these services comply with state and federal laws — Wellness services may
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Early administration of evolocumab significantly reduced levels of LDL cholesterol in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, according to data from an open-label randomized trial of 102 adults in Japan. Data from previous studies have shown that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors can reduce LDL cholesterol in acute
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Vaccines take time to develop. That’s a fact. So as soon as the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the race for a new vaccine took off. Unfortunately, this sense of urgency has also lead to potentially misleading statements and forecasts about the how a vaccine might be ready by the end of the summer, by early fall, and
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Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center. About 22% of children with COVID-19 infections were asymptomatic, and 66% of the symptomatic children had unrecognized symptoms at the time of diagnosis, based on data from a case series of 91 confirmed cases. Although recent reports suggest that COVID-19 infections
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The 24-hour news cycle is just as important to medicine as it is to politics, finance, or sports. At MedPage Today, new information is posted daily, but keeping up can be a challenge. As an aid for our readers and for a little amusement, here is a 10-question quiz based on the news of the
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As stadiums across the country sit empty, sporting organizations have been hard at work coming up with ways to keep their athletes safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. In one of the highest-profile experiments of the year, the National Basketball Association chose to put its teams and support staff into isolation at facilities around the Disney
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